Great Lakes Brewing News April/May 2015 : Page 1

IF YOU The BREW IT, y Will Come The Boilermaker 15k run after party at the Saranac brewery. By Kristen Kuchar raft beer was a $14.3 bil-lion industry in 2013 and is only continuing to grow, according to the Brewers Association. This has a uge economic impact in huge ur region and across our he country. the uccess is One aspect of this success reweries the influence that breweries ypes have had on other types y busi-of businesses. Many red, or nesses have prospered, se of the been created, because booming craft beer industry hening inter-and an ever-strengthening est in craft beer. g and driving is Since drinking never a good idea, people appropri-ately jumped on the opportunity to create a business to safely offer transportation to heir get beer lovers to their destinations. You’ll find a plethora of busses and trollies i that offer yours and transportation to and from a group of breweries. Megan Bulla, co-owner of the Indy Brew Bus (www. indybrewbus.com) says that the idea for her convenient brew bus came when she saw that the Indianapolis beer scene was growing sig-nificantly. “Aside from renting an entire bus or limo, there wasn’t an easy, economica economical way to visit brew-eries,” Bu Bulla explains. The Indy brew visits Central In Indiana breweries including T Taxman Brewing Co., Oaken Barrel Bre Brewing Co., Planetary Brewing Co., Mashcraft Brewing, Indiana City Brewing Co Company, Fountain Square Brewing Co. and Flat 12 Bierwerks. The three hour tour give gives you up to 20 samples of o local beers, and allo allows you to spend a about 35 minutes a at each location. T They’ve got cool-ers o on the bus to keep any gro growlers you may purchase nice and cold, a sampling s score card, water on the bus, and transportation on their bright g green school bus all for the reason reasonable price of $30 per person. Schell's BREWING CO. By Jim Ellingson Jace, Jodi and Ted Marti of August Schell's Brewing Co. PHOTO COURTESTY OF SCHELL'S C ug Schell Brewing ugust has been making great h beer for 155 years. The b company has weathered co the storms and is now th charting a course into ch the future. Here is a th look at the history and the evolutions, as well as a peak into the future. Minnesota's beloved August Schell Brewing Company is the second oldest, family owned and managed brewery in the United States. It was commissioned in 1860, just two years after Minnesota's state-hood in 1858. Pottsville, Pennsylvania's Yeungling Brewery is the oldest, formed in 1829, 42 years after Pennsylvania statehood (1787). Schell's rich history is worth revisit-ing here. August Schell was born in 1828 in Durbach Germany. He moved to the USA in 1848, living in New Orleans and Cincinnati before moving to the New Ulm Minnesota area in 1856 with his wife Theresa and their two daughters. There they joined fellow Turner Society mem-bers in founding New Ulm. The American Turner Motto is “A Sound Mind in a Sound Body.” Of course good beer was required and precious little was to be found – this is See Schell's p.7 See If You Brew It p.4 INSIDE Event Calendar .....................3 Beer Beacon .........................8 Homebrew ............................. 10 NIPAC 2015 Winners ..........17 Beers To Us! .......................25 Map/Directory................ 18-23 State by State News Pennsylvania . 12 Ohio ............... 13 Michigan ........ 14 SW Michigan . 15 SE Michigan .. 16 Indiana .......... 24 Illinois ........... 26 Chicago ......... 26 Wisconsin ..... 28 N Wisconsin .. 29 Minnesota ...... 30 Ontario .......... 32 New York ....... 34 Schell c. 1860 Sc h S he ll l Brewing B re r wi i ng c . 1 18 8 60 6 0

If You Brew It, They Will Come

Kristen Kuchar

Craft beer was a $14.3 billion industry in 2013 and is only continuing to grow, according to the Brewers Association. This has a huge economic impact in our region and across the country.

One aspect of this success the influence that breweries have had on other types of businesses. Many businesses have prospered, been created, because booming craft beer and an ever-strengthening interest in craft beer.

Since drinking never a good idea, appropriately jumped on the opportunity to create a business offer transportation get beer lovers to their destinations. You’ll find a plethora of busses and trollies that offer yours and transportation to and from a group of breweries. Megan Bulla, co-owner of the Indy Brew Bus (www.Indybrewbus.com) says that the idea for her convenient brew bus came when she saw that the Indianapolis beer scene was growing significantly. “Aside from renting an entire bus or limo, there wasn’t an easy, economical way to visit breweries,” Bulla explains.

The Indy brew visits Central Indiana breweries including Taxman Brewing Co., Oaken Barrel Brewing Co., planetary Brewing Co., Mashcraft Brewing Indiana City Brewing Company, Fountain Square Brewing Co. and Flat 12 Bierwerks.

The three hour tour gives you up to 20 samples of local beers, and allows you to spend about 35 minutes at each location.

They’ve got coolers on the bus to keep and growlers you may purchase nice and cold, a sampling score Card, water on their bright green school bus all for the reasonable price of $30 per person.

The Cleveland Brew Bus (www.clevelandbrewbus. com) visits The Brew Kettle, Fat Heads, and Platform Beer Company offering a chance to taste three to four samples at each location and a meal at one of the breweries.

The Hop Head Beer Tour (608-467-5707, www.hopheadbeertours.com) in Madison offers a few different options for brew tours. Their County Road Brewery Bus Tour visits New Glarus, Grumpy Troll Brewpub and Wisconsin Brewing Co. Their Madison tour visits varying breweries including One Barrel Brewing, Karben4 Brewing, Next Door Brewing, Ale Asylum, Vintage Brewing, Wisconsin Brewing and Capital Brewery.

The New York Beer and Brewery Tour (www.tourguidesofnewyork.com) travels throughout Queens, Brooklyn and Manhattan to visit Birreria Brewery, Brooklyn Brewery, Spuyten Duyvil and Bohemiam Hall. The Little Beer Bus (www.thelittlebeerbus.com) offers five or six tastings at Hudson Valley breweries.

The Twin Cities Brewery Tour in Minnesota gives guests a behind the scene look with brewery tours at Boom Island Brewing, Bauhaus Brew Labs and NorthGate Brewing.

Motors to Peddles to Footsteps

And it’s not just motorized tours that feature breweries. You’ll find many bike tours, such as Bobby’s Bike Hike in Chicago that offers a popular Bikes, Bites & Brews Tour (www.bobbysbikehike.com, 708-207-7672). The 21 and over bike tour takes rides to Goose Island and RJ Grunts and offers beer samples at both, along with sampling deep dish pizza at Gino’s East, hot dogs from Murphy’s Red Hots and cupcakes from Swirlz through popular Chicago neighborhoods like Wrigleyville, Gold Coast, Old Town, Lakeview and Lincoln Park.

The Motor City Brew Tour (www.Motorcitybrewtours.com) in Michigan offers a walking tour to Royal Oak Brewery, Bastone Brewery and Lily’s Seafood & Brewery, along with bus and bike tours as well. A walking tour is also available at the Philly on Tap Walking Tour, which is a 2 hours exploration of the local beer scene. One drink at each bar is included in the tour, in addition to snacks.

The Inn at Cooperstown, in Cooperstown, NY (607-547-5756, www.innatcooperstown. com) took the idea of transportation to a brewery and elevated it to include an entire beercentered vacation package. The cozy inn offers a popular package with Brewery Ommegang. If you opt for this deal, an entire weekend itinerary offers transportation to and from the brewery, a VIP guided tour and tasting at the brewery with a brewer, and a multi-course gourmet beer dinner and food pairing. Going along with all the fun, some swag includes a jerboam of Ommegang beer signed by the brewmaster, an Ommegang glass, your choice of sweatshirt or t-shirts and a free draft beer with your meal purchase at The Pit.

Dinner is Served

While a beer dinner at Brewery Ommegang would be a delight for any beer or culinary lovers, there is no shortage of beer dinners throughout the region, something that has had a favorable on the restaurant industry.

Chances are, you’ve at least heard of, if not been to a restaurant hosting a beer dinner. Generally these are dinners where the menu is created with craft beer in mind, often with each course paired with a different beer, and at times, using beer to cook the food as well. Heaven on Seven (Naperville, Ill., 630-717-0777) hosts a seven course beer dinner. Fittingly, the Cajun restaurant chose Louisiana’s Abita Brewing to pair with their glazed pork, a red bean soup with crawfish, an open-faced muffaletta, grits, shrimp stew, and a stout pound cake. The beer selection and beer menus at restaurants continue to expand and become a draw to beer lovers.

That food and craft beer fusion doesn’t stop with restaurants hosting events. You’ll find numerous breweries that serve food, many boasting menus filled with local ingredients from nearby butchers, bakers, farms, and other food businesses.

Original Gravity Brewing Company (Milan, Mich., 734-439-7490) serves fresh beer bread from Erie Bread Company every Wednesday. Piece Brewery and Pizzeria (Chicago, Ill., 773- 772-4422) often teams up with local chefs and restaurants to create unique pizzas. Most recently, the award-winning brewery featured a pizza with iconicChicago hot dog stand, Hot Doug’s, to create a spicy Atomic Pizza. Ithaca Brewing in Ithaca, NY built a beautiful café and beer garden with a multi-tap bar and great food, much of it locally sourced.

One of the food related businesses affected by breweries are food trucks. Throughout the region, food trucks are a staple at breweries that often don’t serve food, allowing patrons to have a variety of cuisines and styles of food as they enjoy their brews. Imperial Oak Brewing (501 Willow Blvd., Willow Springs, Ill., 708- 559-7311) features local food trucks including Chicago Dawgs, Pierogi Wagon, Pizza Via, Piko’s, Pizza Via, Toasty Cheese, Grill Chasers, and more. Minnesota’s Butcher Salt food truck makes regular appearances at Insight Brewing, Steel Tow Brewing, 612 Brew, Bauhaus Brew Labs, HammerHeart Bewing Co. And Indeed Brewing.

Getting Creative

While these certain industries, such as restaurants, grocery stores, transportation, tourism, and other food related industries have been positively affected by the craft beer boom. There are businesses that you might not correlate with beer which beer has nonetheless had an impact on. For example, beer apparently is a muse for creativity, with various companies offering the opportunity to paint while drinking craft beer. You can find these events at an actual studio, where guests are encouraged to bring their own beer while they are instructed on how to paint a piece—better still, many paint companies host events actually at a brewery, bar or restaurant. All levels of painters are welcome at most events, and it’s simply something different to enjoy. Paint Nite (www.Paintnite.com) offers the latter of the two options, hosting painting events at breweries across the region, including Capital Brewery in Middleton, Wisc., Vintage Brewing Company in Madison, Wisc. And Grizzly Peak Brewing Company in Ann Arbor to name a few.

“Our events are much more about being social than being about art, so the concept works well as a social event in a setting that inspires a community of people to get together, and breweries are typically perfect places for our weekly events to be held,” said, Sean McGrail, co-founder of Paint Nite.

Another example of this is seen with Bottle & Bottega (www.bottlesandbottega.com), which offer opportunities to not only paint on canvas, but also on growlers and pint glasses.

In Good Health

Surprisingly enough, the health industry has also been connected to breweries as well. You’ll find health related events, like yoga sessions hosted by yoga studios or fun runs often partnered with nearby running stores, hosted by breweries across the region. Nowadays, it’s hard not to come across a 5k or marathon where you won’t find a cold beer waiting for you at the end. The post-race party for the hugely popular Boilermaker run (www.boilermaker.com) in Utica, NY, held this year on Sunday, July 12, is hosted by Saranac (F X Matt) beer (www.saranac. com). Up to 40,000 people attend, and they drink a lot of Saranac beer. The Minneapolis Marathon (www.minneapolismarathon.com) in Minneapolis, MN, held this year on May 31, gives runners free beer at any Cara Pubs.

Craft brewing’s effect on the region also includes a rapidly increasing number of farms growing hops and malts, and in some cases, breweries themselves are getting in to farming, like Empire Brewing Co. In Syracuse, NY, which is creating a farmstead brewery, to include farming, brewing and packaging in nearby Cazenovia, NY. Breweries in other parts of the country are doing the same thing.

It all starts with brewing great, local beer, but that is only the beginning.

Read the full article at http://archive.brewingnews.com/article/If+You+Brew+It%2C+They+Will+Come/1974594/252822/article.html.

Schell's Brewing Co.

Jim Ellingson

August Schell Brewing has been making great beer for 155 years. The company has weathered the storms and is now charting a course into the future. Here is a look at the history and the evolutions, as well as a peak into the future.

Minnesota's beloved August Schell Brewing Company is the second oldest, family owned and managed brewery in the United States. It was commissioned in 1860, just two years after Minnesota's statehood in 1858. Pottsville, Pennsylvania's Yeungling Brewery is the oldest, formed in 1829, 42 years after Pennsylvania statehood (1787).

Schell's rich history is worth revisiting here. August Schell was born in 1828 in Durbach Germany. He moved to the USA in 1848, living in New Orleans and Cincinnati before moving to the New Ulm Minnesota area in 1856 with his wife Theresa and their two daughters. There they joined fellow Turner Society members in founding New Ulm. The American Turner Motto is “A Sound Mind in a Sound Body.” Of course good beer was required and precious little was to be found – this is Pre civil war times in the wilds of Minnesota. August worked as a machinist in a flour mill until 1860 when he partnered with St. Paul brewmaster Jacob Bernhardt in opening their small brewery on the banks of the Cottonwood River just outside of town. They brewed 200 barrels of beer that first year (one barrel is 31.5 gallons or roughly 14 cases, 200 barrels is roughly two truckloads), using water from an artesian spring and ice from the Cottonwood. The river was also an important transportation resource in the 1800's.

Historic Growth

The first dark clouds arrived in the form of the Dakota Conflict of 1862. The Native Americans were understandably pissed off and burned the town of New Ulm, but Theresa Schell had established good relations with them and the brewery was spared.

Brewmaster Bernhardt became ill in 1868 and sold his half of the brewery to August for $12,000. The brewery further blossomed under August's management, and he turned over day to day operations to his sons Adolph and Otto in 1878. Adolph ran the business while German trained Otto made the beer. When Adolph moved out of state, Otto partnered with his brother-in-law George Marti to run the brewery. August and Theresa built the beautiful Schell's Mansion and Gardens in 1885. August commissioned a 112 barrel capacity copper brew kettle to keep up with demand. That $25,000 kettle was in use until 1999. August passed in 1891 at the age of 63, leaving the brewery to Theresa. Otto added mechanical refrigeration to the brewery in 1900 and the growing business was incorporated in 1902. Theresa, Otto and George ran the brewery until 1911 when Otto and then Theresa passed away suddenly. George Marti took full control and ran the brewery until his death in 1934.

Of course, no legal beer was brewed during the dark ages of prohibition from 1919 until that glorious morning in 1933. The US brewery count plummeted from 1,900 to just 600 during those 14 dry years. Schell’s weathered the storm by shifting production to near beer, soft drinks and candy.

George’s son Aflred took over brewery operations in 1934 and began sponsoring the Schell’s Hobo Band in 1948. Alfred retired in 1969, turning over the taps to son Warren. Warren was most creative in keeping the Schell’s Brewery alive. He broadened the Schell’s line to include 1919 Root Beer (delicious!), Schell’s Export and Schell’s Light (it was the 70’s, after all.). A very large black walnut tree on the property gave its all—it was harvested (sacrificed?) And the wood sold in 1978 in order to keep the brewery solvent.

The Modern Era

Current CEO Ted Marti took over in 1984. Ted studied at Siebel’s Institue of Brewing as well as several breweries in Germany. Ted’s formal training and dedication have paid off handsomely. Schell’s Pils and Schell's Weizen earned gold medals at the 1988 Great American Beer Festival. Building on the early craft beer momentum, Schell’s developed a line of specialty beers in 1990. (I sat for the very first Beer Judge Certification Exam given in Minnesota in 1991 and Schell’s Krystal Weizen was one of the four sample beers – way ahead of our time.)

Recall the tumult in the regional brewing industry of the late 1990’s. G Heileman and Stroh’s Brewing had both gone under. August Schell’s lovely 112 barrel copper kettle finally could be renewed no more and was retired from brewing in 1999. Ted Marti had the considerable fortitude, vision and courage to invest $600,000 in a state of the art 140 barrel brew house. The four vessel brewhouse was built on a system salvaged from the former East Germany and updated with state of the art NERB controls. The new system was a leap forward in the quality, quantity and variety of beers produced.

Current production is a high as five batches a day, five days a week. Much of the beer produced during the years in between was under contract for some very familiar labels. Pete's Wicked Ale was never better than when it was brewed by Schells.

Small worlds and big gambles

Saint Paul's Jacob Schmidt Brewing was known as Benzberg Brewing when Schell's founding brewmaster Jacob Bernhardt was at the helm. The familiar brewery on West 7th operated for many years as Schmidt, Pfeiffer, G. Heileman and finally Minnesota Brewing. Minn Brew had acquired the Grain Belt labels prior to their bankruptcy in 2002. Ted Marti purchased the 109 year old Grain Belt Brands in 2002. This considerable investment allowed Schell's to get out of the contract brewing business. Schell's sales more than doubled in 2003, from 24,000 to over 53,000 barrels. Strong sales of Grain Belt Premium and Grain Belt Nordeast, debuted in 2010, continue to pace growth at Schell's.

Moving Forward

Schell's brewed eight draft only, single batch beers to commemorate their 150 Anniversary. These eight brews were modern takes on entries from a book of pre prohibition recipes found at the brewery. An online poll selected Hopfenmalz for continued production and bottling. Schell's has built on the draft series tradition with the Stag Series. These are experimental, limited run brews offered a couple of times a year on draft and in bottles. Next up in the Stag Series will be a full-on 30% rye beer aged in Jack Daniels whiskey casks. I've dubbed it “Jace and Jack” but I don't know if that will show up on the bottles. Rye is a formidable grain, full flavored with a tendency to gum up the mash of the most experienced brewer, even at just 10% of the grain bill.

Aiming High

Ted's oldest son, Jace Marti, became a brewmaster in 2010. Jace received much of his training in Berlin, and tartly refreshing Berliner Weiss beers are near to his heart. Schell's has been exploring these styles and treating their fans to the results. The Noble Star Series beers undergo a second fermentation using one or more Brettanomyces yeast strains and brewing bacteria. In the case of Framboise Du Nord, 5000 pounds of raspberries were added to a batch of the original Star of the North Berliner Weisse. Noble Stars are hand bottled with corks and cages in sturdy 750 ml glass. Latest in the series is Dawn of Aurora, a starkbier version of Berliner Weisse. Starkbiers were brewed to about double the normal gravity and strength of a Berliner Weisse and then aged for an extended period for flavor development. Dawn of Aurora was brewed using an intense decoction and fermented with yeast, brett and brewers bacteria. It weighs in at 8% alcohol and was aged for 12 months in a cypress vat. The weight is well suited to the refreshing acidity and carbonation.

Brewers spend countless hours perfecting their craft, but they are ultimately at the mercy of their yeast. A bit like a spouse, brewer's yeast usually behaves as expected but not always. Ales require about 2 weeks’ time from brewing to packing. Ordinary lagers and strong ales typically spend four weeks in the tank, while doppel bocks require 60 days or more. If yeast is the spouse, then brett and bacteria are the teenage children. These beers require 6 to 18 months aging, preferably in a wooden vessel. Precocious? You bet.

Something Old, Something New

Schell's used ten 140 barrel cypress aging vats from 1936 until 1993. The tanks sat empty in a storage area with a dirt floor for 22 years, and are now being revived for use in the Noble Star Brewery, a 12,000 square foot ground-up facility on the north side of town. Eight of the tanks have been moved to the new building while the remaining two are occupied aging future releases of Noble Star. Cypress is very well suited to the task. Oak barrels must never be stored empty—they'll dry out and never hold liquid again. A few of these cypress tanks are holding water without any reconditioning and all are in great shape. Wort will be produced at the Schell's plant and then trucked to Noble Star for fermentation. Brett and bacteria will be used in the wood vats while the fruit beers will be fermented in stainless steel tanks.

Plans call for a tap room and an open kitchen featuring local guest chefs opening later this year. A patio will be added in the future. Schell's has a capacity of about 250,000 barrels per year, depending on the product mix. Given the 6 to 18 month aging requirement of the Noble Star beers, the Noble Star capacity will be roughly one batch per vat per year or about 1400 barrels per year. Savor that sour delight! It's been a long time brewing.

Dedication to craft and quality are evident throughout the line and the brewery. Schell's has invested in a very complete on site lab, and equally important, Jace Marti is one of the three full time lab staff. Equipment upgrades such as Krones(tm) canning line are state of the art.

The Schell's Brewery tour, the Schell's Gardens and the new Star Keller Taproom are well worth your time! Come experience a living, vital mecca of mid-American brewing and culture.

Read the full article at http://archive.brewingnews.com/article/Schell%27s+Brewing+Co./1974601/252822/article.html.

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